Ep. 56: The Thing (1982)

Welcome to our 4th Annual Holiday Spooktacular.  This year, Nate and Ryan discuss John Carpenter’s The Thing, a 1982 horror flop that has become a bona fide classic.  Listen as they discuss what has made The Thing into such a beloved film and how it has aged over the past 35 years.  This is also Can We Still Be Friends first John Carpenter movie, and we were glad to have the chance to celebrate another master filmmaker.

Is The Thing one of your go-to horror movies?  What are your thoughts on it?  Where does it rank among horror movies?  Where does it rank among Kurt Russel movies?  How long was it before you slept soundly after that stomach bit off those hands?  Let us know!

Ep. 55: Starship Troopers

Nate and Ryan continue their unofficial tour through 1997 by watching director Paul Verhoeven’s divisive sci-fi cult classic, Starship Troopers.  Joined by guest (and Starship Troopers fan) Dan Wartsbaugh, Nate and Ryan try to find out if this is a scathing, brilliant satire, skewering the tropes of violence-worshiping blockbuster action flicks, or a dumb, dumb, dumb, dumb, silly violence-worshiping blockbuster action flick.  The movie’s stock has certainly risen in the 20 years since its release, as many critics have revisited the movie and praise Verhoeven’s incisive anti-war spin on Robert Heinlein’s pro-military novel.

But are claims of a satiric vision enough?  What are your thoughts on Starship Troopers?  Has your mind changed over the years?  How much schlock can be forgiven in the name of satire?  Is it ever not cool to watch alien bug explosions?  Let us know!

Ep. 54: Wayne’s World and Austin Powers

For most of the ’90s, Mike Meyers’ catchphrases were repeated ad nauseam everywhere from dorm rooms to boardrooms (We’re guessing.  We weren’t in a single boardroom in the ’90s, but you get it).  With Wayne’s World celebrating its 25th anniversary and Austin Powers celebrating its 20th, Nate and Ryan decided to watch both in their first ever Can We Still Be Friends Double Feature!

While watching movies you loved in middle school is always a risk, the lasting impact Meyers has had on comedy is always worth a revisit.

What’s your history with these movies?  After 20 years, is Dr. Evil funny?  Why has Wayne’s World become a classic?  Let us know!

Mentioned in this episode…

Hollywood Reporter’s oral history of Austin Powers

Sound Opinions interview with Penelope Spheeris

The Weird Origins of “That’s What She Said”