Ep 67: The Social Network

In 2010, the conversation around Facebook was mainly something like, “Holy crap, my parents are on Facebook. Should I delete my account?”

Eight years later, the conversation is more like, “Holy crap, an enemy power hijacked our democracy and nationalism has a very visible platform and white supremacists have a growing influence and my personal info is being sold without my consent or knowledge and nothing is true anymore or false anymore on Facebook. Should I delete my account?”

Nate and Ryan decided it’s time to discuss The Social Network, director David Fincher and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin’s 2010 look at the (then) newly emerging dark side of Silicon Valley.  While most of America complained that their “Wall” became a “News Feed,” Sorkin and Fincher noticed that these baby titans of a baby industry were just like every titan of every industry who had come before: ruthless, egotistical, petty, and fragile.  Between Fincher’s distinct direction, Sorkin’s verbose and witty screenplay, and a revelatory score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, Nate and Ryan have a lot to talk about.

 

Read Kaitlyn Tiffany’s article for The Verge mentioned in the episode – In 2010, The Social Network was searing – now it looks quaint.

Ep 66: Halloween (1978)

For the 5th Annual Holiday Spooktacular, Nate and Ryan discuss another bona fide classic, John Carpenters’ Halloween.  John Carpenter’s cheap, fast horror flick defied the odds and set a new standard for the genre, and as it’s celebrating its 40th anniversary, it seemed like the perfect time to relive “the night HE came home.” Listen as Nate and Ryan discuss Halloween‘s legacy and how the movie looks 40 years and 11 sequels later.

What’s your history with Halloween?   Where does it rank among horror movies for you? Who’s the scariest horror movie villain?  Let us know!

And don’t forget to check out Halloween Unmasked. The Ringer’s excellent podcast about all things Michael Myers hosted by Amy Nicholson.

Ep 65: Vertigo

Nate and Ryan discuss their first Alfred Hitchcock classic, 1958’s Vertigo.  As the film has gained more and more respect over the years, Nate and Ryan decided that it was time for them to really examine this beloved psychological mind-bender.  Like so many hallmarks of cinema before and since, Vertigo befuddled critics and audiences when it was released, and was kept more or less under wraps by Hitchcock’s estate for several decades.  Nate and Ryan discuss what makes this slow-burn entry into film canon so mesmerizing.

What are your thoughts on Hitchcock?  Is Vertigo rightly up there with his best?  Let us know!

Ep. 64: Bull Durham

Nate and Ryan escape the summer heat by watching Bull Durham, a sports classic from 1988 that helped catapult Kevin Costner into Hollywood super-stardom.  Bull Durham is often hailed as the best sports movie of all time, so Nate and Ryan decided to weigh in for themselves.  After 30 years, how does this tale of small-time baseball players, small-town romancers, and has-been talents hold up?  Nate and Ryan discuss if Bull Durham has any life left in it.

Where does Bull Durham rank for you?  Is there another sports movie that takes the top spot for you?  Do you believe in opening presents on Christmas Day or Christmas Eve? Let us know!

Also, let us know your thoughts on our next movie: Vertigo.

Ep. 63: Can’t Hardly Wait

As the school year winds down and summer brings life-long change (or so teen comedies would have us believe), Nate and Ryan discuss Can’t Hardly Wait.  Released 20 years ago, some of the hallmarks of late ’90s and early ’00s teen comedies can be traced back to Can’t Hardly Wait, yet it doesn’t quite hold a place among the “Teen Comedy Classics.”  Nate and Ryan discuss whether it belongs there, and what qualifies a film for a place among the beloved. They also get unexpectedly serious in discussing whether a movie that accurately depicts the troubling social dynamics of its day has a place in today’s culture.

Was Can’t Hardly Wait a part of your teen years?  What is your favorite teen comedy?  What makes a “great” teen comedy in your mind? Let us know!