Ep 68: Love Actually

It’s a romantic Christmas for Nate and Ryan as they discuss Love Actually, the 2003 holiday rom-com starring Keira Knightley, Hugh Grant, and most of the other British movie stars you can think of in the pre-Benedict-Cumberbatch era of British movie stars. Celebrating its 15th anniversary, Love Actually has become an annual favorite for many, including Nate’s and Ryan’s wives. Listen in as they discuss what sticks and what doesn’t in this throw-it-all-at-the-wall Christmas epic.

Is Love Actually in your annual holiday movie rotation?  Let us know your thoughts!

Mentioned in the episode:
Love Actually is the Least Romantic Film of All Time by Christopher Orr (The Atlantic)
I Will Not Be Ashamed of Loving Love Actually by Emma Green (The Atlantic)

Ep 67: The Social Network

In 2010, the conversation around Facebook was mainly something like, “Holy crap, my parents are on Facebook. Should I delete my account?”

Eight years later, the conversation is more like, “Holy crap, an enemy power hijacked our democracy and nationalism has a very visible platform and white supremacists have a growing influence and my personal info is being sold without my consent or knowledge and nothing is true anymore or false anymore on Facebook. Should I delete my account?”

Nate and Ryan decided it’s time to discuss The Social Network, director David Fincher and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin’s 2010 look at the (then) newly emerging dark side of Silicon Valley.  While most of America complained that their “Wall” became a “News Feed,” Sorkin and Fincher noticed that these baby titans of a baby industry were just like every titan of every industry who had come before: ruthless, egotistical, petty, and fragile.  Between Fincher’s distinct direction, Sorkin’s verbose and witty screenplay, and a revelatory score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, Nate and Ryan have a lot to talk about.

 

Read Kaitlyn Tiffany’s article for The Verge mentioned in the episode – In 2010, The Social Network was searing – now it looks quaint.

Ep 66: Halloween (1978)

For the 5th Annual Holiday Spooktacular, Nate and Ryan discuss another bona fide classic, John Carpenters’ Halloween.  John Carpenter’s cheap, fast horror flick defied the odds and set a new standard for the genre, and as it’s celebrating its 40th anniversary, it seemed like the perfect time to relive “the night HE came home.” Listen as Nate and Ryan discuss Halloween‘s legacy and how the movie looks 40 years and 11 sequels later.

What’s your history with Halloween?   Where does it rank among horror movies for you? Who’s the scariest horror movie villain?  Let us know!

And don’t forget to check out Halloween Unmasked. The Ringer’s excellent podcast about all things Michael Myers hosted by Amy Nicholson.